PERCEPTION ACTION COGNITION TALK
Friday November 13th 2015, 10:30am
PERCEPTION ACTION COGNITION LAB OPEN DAY TALKS
Lab members will give a short 10 minute description of their recent research. The talk order is:

10:30 - 11:00
Frank Pollick - Using Intersubject Correlation and auditory and visual feature analysis to understand brain processing of watching a string quartet

Salim Al-Wasity - Decoded neurofeedback for motor imagery learning

Christina Korobka - The effect of perceived vocal trustworthiness on amygdalae activation


11:00 - 11:20 Coffee Break

11:20 - 11:50
Polina Zioga - Real-Time Passive Multi-Brain Interaction in ‘Enheduanna – A Manifesto of Falling’ Live Brain-Computer Cinema Performance

Ioannis Politis - Multimodal Driver Displays

Paula Regener - Audiovisual temporal perception differences in autism spectrum disorder revealed by a model-based analysis
PRESENTED BY
Lab members
INVITED BY
Frank E. Pollick

12:00pm: MOTOR CONTROL THEORY AND BRAIN MACHINE INTERFACES
Brain-computer interfaces, or brain-machine interfaces (BMIs), have seen wide development over the last decade. BMIs measure or stimulate neurons in the brain directly and decode neuronal firings to generate information. However, it is impossible to measure all neuron activities in the brain because of the enormous quantity of neurons. It is also difficult to decode brain signals because of the functional complexity and numerous unknowns. Therefore, anatomical knowledge, such as the cortical homunculus of the primary motor cortex (M1) and the primary somatosensory cortex, the neural representation of M1, is used. These areas are related to movement and tactile sensation. In the field of motor control, motor command generation is still an open problem, and many theories have been proposed.

In this talk, we introduce a new motor control hypothesis in which trajectory planning is not needed, and final position is the only information used to produce motion. Exact duration time is also a result of movement and is not needed for planning. Also, this hypothesis reproduces the experimental results of Bizzi which rejected the end point control hypothesis.

Until now, several hypotheses have been proposed for the relationship between neural activity in M1 and motor control. Among these are hypotheses that neural activity of M1 encodes movement direction, force, and both of movement direction and force. Nevertheless, we have yet to discover the exact relationship between the neural activity in M1 and motor control. BMI techniques are useful in evaluating and verifying these hypotheses.
PRESENTED BY
Yasuharu Koike
Professor
from the Tokyo Institute of Technology
INVITED BY
Frank E. Pollick