NEWS
July 14th 2017:

We are delighted to announce that the School of Psychology has been successful in its application to host the British Psychological Society Scottish Branch Undergraduate Student Conference in March 2018.



June 26th 2017:

CuttingEEG 2017

Well done to everyone involved in organising this year’s event, which took place between 19–22 June.

Professor Philippe Schyns said: “Many thanks to Marios Philiastides, his team and support for organising what has been the most successful conference so far in terms of number of participants, diversity of topics, prominent international speakers and participation from the audience.”



June 23rd 2017:

“Your Multisensory Brain" with Stephanie Boyle

The Question of Perception lectures bring experts in brain science and perception to Glasgow Science Centre to talk about the science behind our new exhibition - Question of Perception - and to explore how our brains work.

Wednesday 12 July 2017

18:30–21:00

details:www.glasgowsciencecentre.org/special-events/



June 22nd 2017:

Congratulations to Dr Niamh Stack who has received a Teaching Excellence Award in Individual Excellence from the College of Science and Engineering.

The awards are given to individuals who demonstrate excellent teaching practice throughout their work and who have made a significant contribution to learning and teaching in their subject area.

Dr Stack has played a leading role in shaping UK undergraduate psychology education nationally through her position as Chair of the BPS Undergraduate Education Committee (BPS).

The award was presented at the Graduation Reception on Thursday 22 June in the Kelvin Gallery.



June 21st 2017:

Congratulations to Lorna Morrow, Maxine Swingler, Phil McAleer and Niamh Friel who are the recipients of the first Paddy O’Donnell Teaching Excellence award, for their project entitled “My anxiety levels rise just flicking the pages”, which addresses statistics anxiety in Level 2 Psychology Students.

The Paddy O’Donnell Teaching Excellence award was set up last year in memory of Paddy’s immense contribution to Psychology at Glasgow. The award provides an opportunity for individuals or groups to be recognised for an outstanding contribution to the missions, values and priorities in learning and teaching within the School and the INP.

The award was presented at the Graduation Reception on Thursday 22 June in the Kelvin Gallery.



June 8th 2017:
Sweet or savoury? Dr. Marios Philiastides’ lab publishes a paper in Nature Communications on the neural systems involved in value-based decision making. Many decisions in life are based on personal preferences. For example when ordering a dessert at a restaurant, one needs to decide whether they prefer a chocolate cake or a cheese platter. What is the mechanism and source of this deliberation process and how does it differ from decisions based primarily on perceptual evidence (that is, choosing the larger of the items)? Using simultaneous EEG-fMRI and computational modeling, this work endorsed the proposition of an evidence accumulation process during value-based decisions (similar to that reported previously for perceptual decisions) and implicated the posterior-medial frontal cortex in this process. The work was funded by the BBSRC and ESRC.

May 18th 2017:

Time to look beyond differences in means!

Guillaume Rousselet (INP), Cyril Pernet (University of Edinburgh) & Rand Wilcox (University of Southern California) have released a tutorial explaining why data analyses limited to differences in means can be misleading, and why bar graphs are inappropriate graphical representations. As an alternative to these classic but outdated approaches, the tutorial presents powerful modern tools based on detailed illustrations of effects and robust inferences. The tutorial, in press at the European Journal of Neuroscience, is supported by publicly available datasets and analysis code in R and Matlab.

May 12th 2017:
The first Workshop on Rhythms in the Brain (WoRB) will be held in Glasgow on Monday 11th September 2017. WoRB sets the stage for four leading experts show-casing and discussing their state-of-the-art research. Condensed talks and discussions aim to foster scientific exchange and spawn future perspectives for studying the functional role of intrinsic brain rhythms. Two key aspects will be in the spotlight: 1) What do brain rhythms code for and how do they give rise to the complexity and efficiency in human behaviour? 2) How can we drive brain rhythms and establish their causal role in cognition through brain stimulation? For more info see: wworb.ccni.gla.ac.uk

May 11th 2017:
To honour the pioneering work of Karen Spärck Jones, the British Computer Society holds a distinguished lecture in her name each year, celebrating a prominent female computing researcher. This year's lecture will be delivered by Dr Maja Mataric and will be streamed live from the School of Computing Science, preceded by a public social robotics demo session. Maja Mataric is the Professor and Chan Soon-Shiong Chair of Computer Science, Neuroscience & Pediatrics; Founding Director at the USC's Robotics and Autonomous Systems Center; and Director of the USC's Robotics Research Lab. The social robotics demo session will take place in the Atrium of the Wolfson Medical Building from 15:00-17:00. The demo will be followed by a live stream of the lecture in Room 208 of the Sir Alexander Stone building.

April 20th 2017:
Science in the pub! Come support four of our researchers taking part in the Pint of Science public engagement festival. Niamh Stack, Phil McAleer, Heather Woods and Frank Pollick will be showcasing a range of the School’s cutting-edge research, from giftedness to voice perception and sleep to neuroaesthetics. Pint of Science aims to deliver interesting and relevant talks to the public on the latest research, in an accessible format, all hosted in pubs across the country. This year for the first time in Glasgow, the 'Beautiful Mind' theme will host three nights of talks on Neuroscience and Psychology in the Hug and Pint on 15-17th May 2017. Get your tickets at: www.pintofscience.co.uk/events/glasgow/

March 27th 2017:
Success at the BPS-Scotland Undergraduate Conference 2017 A large group of third and fourth year students attended the BPS Scotland Undergraduate Conference hosted by the School of Psychology at the University of Edinburgh. The conference was attended by nearly 400 students from across Scotland. University of Glasgow students were selected to present over a third of the presentations on the day. Five prizes were presented for the Best Talks of the day and three of these were won by Glasgow students, Veronica Stonka, Inga Marie Freud, and Laura Hensel. Congratulations to them and everyone else who presented at this year’s conference.

March 27th 2017:
Wilhelmiina Toivo, a PhD student of Christoph Sheepers, is joint winner of the ESRC writing competition 2017 (£1000 award): Quoting from the ESRC web-site: In her winning essay "Once more, with feeling: life as bilingual" Wilhelmiina Toivo, from the University of Glasgow wrote about her experiences growing up in Scotland speaking English as a second language, and how speaking in her non-native tongue gave her a sense of liberation when it came to swearing and discussing her emotions. This personal insight linked well to her PhD research project, which focuses on why many bilinguals report feeling less emotionally connected to their second language, a phenomenon known as the reduced emotional resonance of language.

March 22nd 2017:
Dr Rachael Jack of the University of Glasgow has been awarded the 2017 Spearman Medal. Dr Jack has conducted a significant body of research on emotion communication across cultures, particularly facial expressions. As well as having her work published in various high impact journals, National Geographic, The Wall Street Journal, New Scientist and Time Magazine amongst others, Dr Jack’s work has received several international awards and featured in the Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition 2015. She said, “I am absolutely thrilled to receive the Spearman Medal. My greatest thanks goes to the BPS for awarding this prize, and especially to Professor Simon Garrod who nominated me. It’s a great honour to join such a stellar list of previous winners, many of whom have inspired and shaped the field. I hope that my work will inspire the new generation of researchers, and to encourage wider participation in psychological science."

March 17th 2017:
In acknowledgment of the School’s dedication to teaching and supervision a magnificent 7 members of our staff were nominated for an SRC Student Teaching Award 2016-17, with Lars Muckli & Margaret Martin winning their respective categories.

David Simmons: Best Research Supervisor, Judith Stevenson: Best Adviser of Studies, Steve Draper: Best Research Supervisor, Niamh Stack: Best Teacher College of Science & Engineering, Dale Barr: Best Feedback, Margaret Martin: Best Adviser of Studies, Lars Muckli: Best Dissertation Supervisor

The School, on behalf of the staff, would like to thank everyone who nominated this year and applaud the continued excellent standard of its teaching staff.

February 27th 2017:
The 9th SINAPSE Annual Scientific Meeting will be held on Friday, 16th June 2017 at Queen Elizabeth University Hospital Glasgow, highlighting the latest developments in clinical and experimental imaging for researchers across Scotland. Abstract submission for short talks and poster presentations is open until 7th April 2017, and this year the meeting programme includes a session on the theme of Imaging Research in Psychology and Psychiatry. Keynote presentation by Prof Arno Villringer, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig. Registration and abstract submission details: www.sinapse.ac.uk/events/2017-sinapse-asm

February 23rd 2017:
To mark the official opening of the Imaging Centre of Excellence (ICE), an Imaging Symposium will take place on Tuesday 28th March 2017 at the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, hosted by the 7T Scientific Co-Chairs Prof Muckli, Dr Goense and Prof Muir. The Symposium is designed to showcase recent developments in 7T MRI across a number of clinical and non-clinical applications, and is being scheduled to dovetail with the MVLS Industry Day/Opening Ceremony taking place the following day. To view the programme and register your attendance, please visit the following webpage: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/imaging-symposium-tickets-31634887801.

February 3rd 2017:
Rare Disease Day takes place on the last day of February each year and showcases some of the amazing work being done to improve patient's lives. Come along and hear a selection of short talks showcasing the work being carried out across the city, featuring researchers, clinicians, charities and families. This first meeting focuses on the central nervous system and genetic disorders. The event is free to attend and lunch, tea and coffee will be provided. For further information and to register for Rare Disease Glasgow please visit Eventbrite. The event takes place on the afternoon of the 28th February in the Yudowitz Lecture Theatre in the Wolfson Medical School. For any enquiries about the event please contact ralph.hector@glasgow.ac.uk.

January 30th 2017:
Rachael Jack of the Institute of Neuroscience & Psychology and the School of Psychology has been selected to receive the Association for Psychological Science (APS) Rising Star designation. It is "in recognition of bright future signified by (her) early career accomplishments” and the award “recognizes outstanding psychological scientists in the earliest stages of their research career post PhD”. APS Rising Stars are considered to be “amongst the brightest minds in our field, setting an impressively high standard for the designation in years to come.” Rachael is also a Member of the RSE Young Academy of Scotland.

January 30th 2017:
The 3rd CuttingEEG Symposium will take place between 19-22 June 2017. Hosted by the Centre for Neuroimaging, University of Glasgow, events will be held at the Sir Charles Building and Boyd Orr Building. For full details, please visit the following website: http://cuttingeeg.ccni.gla.ac.uk/

January 27th 2017:
Dr. Philiastides’ lab publishes a paper in Nature Human Behaviour on the influence of perceptual learning in human decision making. The study challenges the long-standing view that perceptual learning alters primarily early sensory representations and offers, compelling evidence that during perceptual categorization, training amplifies the readout of decision-relevant information during post-sensory neural processing instead. Correspondingly, these enhancements predict the behavioural improvements observed on the task, which are further described by a reinforcement learning mechanism that utilises a reward prediction error signal to strengthen the readout of sensory evidence used for the decision. A Commentary on this work is published by Yuka Sasaki and Takeo Watanabe.

January 26th 2017:
Dr Stephanie Rossit of UEA's School of Psychology and Dr Monika Harvey of the University Glasgow's School of Psychology have developed and tested a new clinical treatment involving a version of visuomotor feedback training (VFT) for rehabilitating visual neglect in stroke patients. Their approach which involves a simple treatment of grasping, lifting and balancing different sized wooden rods, provides different sources of sensory feedback and helps reduce visual neglect. The team also found that VFT improved aspects of the patients' daily lives, such as eating, dressing and social activities. The article is entitled Efficacy of home-based visuomotor feedback training in stroke patients with chronic hemispatial neglect is published in Neuropsychological Rehabilitatio and the press release can be found here.

January 20th 2017:
A very interesting Annual Review of Psychology paper has been published by Rachael Jack and Philippe Schyns, entitled "Toward a Social Psychophysics of Face Communication". A short video can be found here and the paper can be downloaded from here.

January 6th 2017:
Rare Disease Day takes place on the last day of February each year and showcases some of the amazing work being done to improve patient's lives. Come along and hear a selection of short talks showcasing the work being carried out across the city, featuring researchers, clinicians, charities and families. This first meeting focuses on the central nervous system and genetic disorders. The event is free to attend and lunch, tea and coffee will be provided. For further information and to register for Rare Disease Glasgow please visit Eventbrite. The event takes place on the afternoon of the 28th February in the Yudowitz Lecture Theatre in the Wolfson Medical School. For any enquiries about the event please contact ralph.hector@glasgow.ac.uk.

December 6th 2016:
The School of Psychology and the Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging are pleased to announce the availability of PhD (+3) Psychology scholarships from the College of Science and Engineering and a limited amount of fee waivers for applicants to the China Scholarship Council. We may also have available at the date below: MSc (1+3) and PhD (+3) Psychology studentships funded by the Economic & Social Research Council. Deadline for submissions is January 13th 2017 and funding will be available from October 2017. For more information please visit the Postgraduate Research Opportunities and the College of Science and Engineering Scholarship/ESRC DTP scholarship.

November 24th 2016:
The 8th Glasgow Neuroscience Day, will be held at The Queen Elizabeth University Hospital campus, on Wednesday 18th January 2017. This annual event brings neuroscientists from the Universities of Glasgow, Strathclyde and Caledonian, with clinical colleagues from the NHS, together to interact and talk about the latest neuroscience research being carried out in Glasgow. For further information, online registration and abstract submission please visit: Eventbrite

November 24th 2016:
In a recent paper, INP researchers present a new set of statistical tools for analyzing neuroimaging data. This flexible approach provides several advantages, including the ability to look at multivariate signals and to quantify representational interactions between different neural responses. The paper, “A statistical framework for neuroimaging data analysis based on mutual information estimated via a Gaussian copula” is published in Human Brain Mapping.

November 18th 2016:
We are very pleased to announce that the School of Psychology and Institute of Neuroscience & Psychology have been successful in their joint application for a prestigious Athena SWAN Bronze Departmental Award. The Athena SWAN awards, managed by the Equality Challenge Unit (ECU), recognise commitment to tackling gender inequality in higher education.

October 17th 2016:
The Institute of Neuroscience & Psychology and the School of Psychology will host their annual Research Day on Tuesday 15th November 2016. This event will take the format of a series of short presentations by senior PhD students and post-docs, highlighting the breadth of research performed across the fields of neuroscience and psychology. Presentations will cover both ongoing and novel research, including basic research and clinically motivated studies, and span from neurophysiology and anatomy to cognitive neuroimaging, psychophysics and behavioural studies in psychology. This event will provide ample opportunities for students and researchers to learn about the work of others, and will foster interactions and discussions across disciplines and research methods.

October 4th 2016:
Congratulations are given to Ms Holly Scott and Ms Andra Coldea, for their recent success at the Undergraduate Awards (UA) 2016. Ms Scott was announced Regional Winner, with her paper #sleepyteens: Social media use is associated with poor sleep, anxiety, depression and low self-esteem in adolescents, which was also the highest performing paper in the Europe region, in the Psychology category. Ms Coldea received recognition as a Highly Commended Entrant with her paper Dual Brain Imaging During Naturalistic Communication - Empirical Evidence In Support of a More Integrative Approach To Research.

August 2nd 2016:
Best Paper for the prestigious 39th International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval was won by Yashar Moshfeghi, Peter Triantafillou and Frank Pollick for their paper “Understanding Information Need: an fMRI Study”. The study involved a unique collaboration in the College of Science and Engineering between the ‘School of Psychology’ and the ‘School of Computing Science’ to combine experimental techniques of brain imaging and information retrieval. This work was chosen best among a field of 341 submissions for its groundbreaking work in relating existing theories of information need to underlying processes of the human brain.

July 4th 2016:
Researchers from the CCNi have developed a method to characterise oscillatory activity in human resting-state MEG data. They made use of single-trial clustering, which results in robust spectral fingerprints for anatomically defined brain areas. These spectral modes generalise across participants and can be used for automatic classification of regional oscillatory brain activity. Anne Keitel and Joachim Gross published the study in PLoS Biology. The article can be found here

June 14th 2016:
The annual Guardian University Guide was published in May and the School of Psychology were delighted to be ranked 4th nationally behind Cambridge, Bath, and St Andrews. The School earned an overall score of 88.7, and were especially pleased to receive high scores for overall student satisfaction (95%) and satisfaction with teaching (95%). Much of this success is due to the excellent teaching provided by a team of highly qualified University Teachers who lecture and supervise students across all years of study. They work hard to ensure our teaching is research led, involving their researcher colleagues directly in curriculum strand development, assessment and feedback, and skills development in small group teaching.

June 8th 2016:
The University of Glasgow has been nominated for 12 Herald Higher Education Awards with the School of Psychology shortlisted for the Enhancing Student Learning Award, in recognition of its work to improve training in research methods and statistics. The awards celebrate extraordinary work in universities and colleges in Scotland, recognising the exceptional standard of education that is offered throughout Scotland every year. Winners are announced on Thursday 14th July, with Drs. Dale Barr, Phil McAleer, and Niamh Stack representing the School.

May 26th 2016:
The Integrative Neuroscience Lab in the Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology celebrates a new publication in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA (PNAS). The cognitive neuroscientists delineated two mechanisms by which the quality of sensory percepts, such as the pitch of a tone, is shaped by the state of brain activity a few hundred milliseconds before the tone is presented. Mechanisms such as these are important for understanding illusory and aberrant percepts in health and disease.

May 6th 2016:
An intriguing paper published in eLife. “Lip movements entrain the observers’ low-frequency brain oscillations to facilitate speech intelligibility” by Hyojin Park, Christoph Kayser, Gregor Thut, Joachim Gross unravelled the mechanism of how brain signals align to rhythmic lip movements during continuous speech. This study provides new insights into neural mechanisms of human communication with implications for the study of lip-reading between people with hearing difficulties. This work is also selected for the oral presentation and Merit Abstract Award at the OHBM meeting this year. The article can be found here and a nice piece of news can be found here.

March 24th 2016:
Congratulations to Ms Judith Stevenson and Dr Ian Bushnell in their achievements at the recent Student Teaching Awards. Judith was the recipient of "Best Advisor of Studies" and Ian won the award for "Focus on Employability & Entrepreneurship." Congratulations are also extended to Dr Debbie Dewar, Dr Heather Woods, and Dr Dale Barr who received nominations for "Best Dissertation Supervisor", "Best Research Supervisor", and "Most Innovative Teaching" respectively.

March 4th 2016:
Many congratulations to the Level 1 and 2 Psychology students who were awarded Certificates of Academic Achievement for earning an A grade in semester 1. The certificates were presented by the L1 and 2 Course Tutors, Drs Jason Bohan and Maxine Swingler, at a reception in the School’s seminar room where Director of Teaching, Dr Margaret Martin, welcomed the students and congratulated them on their achievement. The Certificates were introduced in 2013 as a way of formally recognising and rewarding hard working students for their sustained excellence during the semester.

March 2nd 2016:
Glasgow psychology researchers have been recognized for their conceptual innovation and potential to motivate new research and further conceptual investigation. The 2016 Social and Affective Neuroscience Society’s Innovation Award has been awarded to Rachael Jack, Oliver Garrod and Philippe Schyns’ paper "Dynamic Facial Expressions of Emotion Transmit an Evolving Hierarchy of Signals over Time", published in Current Biology. Congratulations! This prestigious award recognizes research authored by a SAN member and published in a scholarly outlet that makes a contribution likely to generate the discovery of new hypotheses, new phenomena, or new ways of thinking about the discipline of social and affective neuroscience. The Society’s webpage can be found here and the article can be found here

February 16th 2016:
4th year honours student Raluca Stan has been awarded a $1000 grant from www.trich.org to present her maxi project research at the International Trichotillomania Learning Centre conference in Dallas, Texas. Raluca is the first recipient from a British University to receive the grant. Her research investigating the role of Experiential Avoidance in Skin-Picking Disorder, supervised by Judith Stevenson, is expanding the work currently done into Body Focussed Repetitive Behaviours at Glasgow in a new, exciting direction.

February 16th 2016:
CCNI DEBATE 2016 Monday 21st March, 1:00pm, Senate Room, University of Glasgow Brain reading: how can we decrypt neuronal representations? From popular press reports and cognitive neuroscience findings in prestigious journals, it appears that significant progress has been made in mind and brain reading, and in the capacity of machines to decode thoughts and personality traits and predict behaviour. At the core of these claims is the belief that new methodologies now enable us to infer sophisticated cognitive representations from brain data. But can we? In this CCNi Debate, experts in Neuroscience and Psychology will discuss the methodologies they use to study neuronal representations in the brain; what (i.e. cognitive categories) these methodologies are representing; the advantages and limitations of such methodological approaches in investigating the cognitive categories considered; the future directions for studying neuronal representations of cognitive categories.

December 8th 2015:
A fascinating paper from the School of Psychology and the Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology has just appeared in Scientific Reports. "Tracing the Flow of Perceptual Features in an Algorithmic Brain Network" by Robin Ince, Nicola Rijsbergen, Gregor Thut, Guillaume Rousselet, Joachim Gross, Stefano Panzeri & Philippe Schyns focuses on detailed information flow in brain networks and represents an important step towards a new brain algorithmics to model the mechanisms of perception and cognition. The article can be found here

November 30th 2015:
The School of Psychology and the Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging (within the Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology) are pleased to announce the availability of MSc (1+3) and PhD (+3) studentships funded by the Economic & Social Research Council (ESRC), and PhD (+3) scholarships from the College of Science and Engineering. Funding will be available from October 2016. Deadline for submissions is January 15th 2016. For more information please visit the Postgraduate Research Opportunities and the College of Science and Engineering Scholarship/ESRC DTC scholarship.

October 27th 2015:
SINAPSE is teaming up with the Institute of Physics (IOP) in Scotland to take part in a project asking post graduate students and early career researchers to send in videos explaining how light is used their research. The broad definition of 'light' is being used – anything in the electromagnetic spectrum including PET, SPECT, MRI and [obviously] optical imaging. Can you explain your research to a high school audience? The competition is calling for videos of up to three minutes in length on the theme of light. Smartphone recordings are fine, but please try to ensure the sound is good quality. A panel of judges will select the top three videos and these will be “packaged” by a professional recording company and made available to schools as well as being promoted on a YouTube channel. The best video from SINAPSE will also win £100. The deadline for submission is 30 November 2015. For enquiries, or to submit a video, please contact matwasley@physics.org and copy to kristin.flegal@glasgow.ac.uk.

October 9th 2015:
Professor Lars Muckli's lab have published a paper in Current Biology investigating the visual cortex using high-field, high-resolution brain imaging. Using 7 Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging, the lab have discovered that cortical feedback information is found in the outer layers of human early visual cortex. Feedback information is central to how the brain uses experience, prediction and context to make sense of the world. Understanding feedback in the healthy brain is critical for understanding its dysfunction in mental disorders.

September 3rd 2015:
Rachael Jack is the recipient of Emotion Researcher's Young Researcher Spotlight for her work on facial expressions at the University of Glasgow Her article in Emotion Researcher titled Understanding the Face as a Dynamic Communication Tool can be found here)

August 14th 2015:
Dr. Marios Philiastides’ lab publishes a paper in Nature Communications on the role of feedback processing during reinforcement learning. Using cutting edge multimodal neuroimaging (simultaneous EEG-fMRI), Dr. Philiastides’ team uncovered the spatiotemporal dynamics of two separate but interacting value systems that shape reward learning in the human brain. Their research approach opens up new avenues for the investigation of the neural systems underlying value-based decision making in humans. Crucially, their findings have the potential to further improve our understanding of how everyday responses to rewarding or stressful events can affect our capacity to make optimal decisions, as well as facilitate the study of how mental disorders - such as chronic stress, obsessive-compulsive-disorder, post-traumatic disorder and depression - affect learning and strategic planning.

June 29th 2015:
The University of Glasgow is proud to host the 30th Annual PsyPAG Conference to be held on 22-24 July 2015. The conference will have keynote presentations by three eminent researchers: Prof. Richard Wiseman, Dr. Rachael Jack and Prof. Padraic Monaghan. We also have over 200 postgraduates registered, with around 35 students from the University of Glasgow Institute of Neuroscience & Psychology presenting. Additionally, a series of parallel workshops will provide in-depth tuition and discussion within key topics in psychology, and a packed programme of social events is sure to make the PsyPAG 2015 Conference in Glasgow a very memorable event! More info at : psypag.psy.gla.ac.uk

June 24th 2015:
Glasgow is part of a group of international scientists that has been awarded £724,000 from the US Office of Naval Research in a joint venture with Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council to advance ‘deep scene understanding’ in machines. The goal is to develop mechanisms that can recognise their environments and the behaviours of people within that environment and respond accordingly. Professor Philippe Schyns, Director of the Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology, who is leading the Glasgow contribution to the project said: “If robots of science fiction are to become reality they will need to be much more aware of their surroundings and be able to adapt to situations accordingly – to be more human essentially.” The project is titled - ‘Understanding Scenes and Events through Joint Parsing, Cognitive Reasoning and Lifelong Learning’ and more details are available here)

June 5th 2015:
Psychology at Glasgow has consistently been rated within the top 10 of over 100 UK universities by all the major 'league tables' such as the Times and the Guardian, scoring particularly high in overall satisfaction with the course and the value we add to every student.

June 4th 2015:
Lisa DeBruine (lead exhibitor) together with Philippe Schyns, Ben Jones and Rachael Jack (co-exhibitors) are presenting at the Royal Society Summer Science Exhibit in London at the end of this month. This is the most prestigious UK public engagement event with Glasgow being the only Scottish university represented, plus Face Facts has been selected as one of the three headlining exhibits. The Glasgow Science Centre and Dimensional Imaging helped create the exhibit. See more details here)

March 16th 2015:
Congratulations to Chaona Chen who has won the prestigious Elsevier/Vision Research Travel Awards 2015! This is an extremely competitive award with only the top 10% student research projects succeeding. Chaona will deliver a talk on her PhD work The Face is the Mirror of the Cultural Mind at the next Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting in Florida, USA.

March 12th 2015:
Social Robotics Symposium – Thursday 26 March 2015 The INP/School of Psychology and the School of Computing Science are organising a joint symposium on Social Robotics, to be held on Thursday 26 March 2015 in the Level 5 Seminar Room, 58 Hillhead Street. The purpose of the symposium is to establish interdisciplinary collaborations in the area of social robotics. The symposium itself will comprise short presentations from both Psychology and Computing Science providing an overview of research interests, followed by questions and answers. Date: Thursday 26 March 2015 Time: 12:00 – 17:00 Venue: Level 5 Seminar Room, 58 Hillhead Street

February 12th 2015:
The Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging (CCNi) is hosting its annual debate on Thursday 19 March 2015 at 1pm in the Senate Room, University of Glasgow. The debate will feature 4 international experts on functional imaging, neuroanatomy and brain network dynamics debating the topic ‘’Spontaneous brain activity—spook or spirit?” The speakers are Professor Gustavo Deco (Universitat Pompeu Fabra), Professor Marieke Schölvinck (Ernst Strüngmann Institute), Professor Andreas Kleinschmidt (University of Geneva), and Professor Alain Destexhe (CNRS).

January 2nd 2015:
University of Glasgow is rated UK’s #1 for Research Intensity in Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience (jointly with UCL) according to the Times Higher Education Intensity ranking. Times Higher Education used the REF ‘grade point average’ (GPA) and estimated Research Intensity, which is the GPA multiplied by the proportion of eligible staff submitted. "The College’s Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience submission also excelled with 44% rated 'world-leading': an evaluation which underlined its grounding in excellence, particularly in systems neuroscience, cognitive neuroimaging and social interactions."

December 18th 2014:
The School of Psychology and the Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging (within the Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology) are pleased to announce the availability of - MSc (1+3) and PhD (+3) studentships funded by the Economic & Social Research Council (ESRC), and - PhD (+3) scholarships from the College of Science and Engineering. Funding will be available from October 2015. Deadline for submissions is January 23, 2015. For more information please visit the Postgraduate Research Opportunities page here) and the College of Science and Engineering Scholarship/ESRC DTC scholarship page here)

October 8th 2014:
PhD student Ioannis Politis received the Best Paper Award at the 6th International Conference on Automotive User Interfaces and Interactive Vehicular Applications (AutoUI2014), held in Seattle, WA, USA. The title of his paper was ‘Speech Tactons Improve Speech Warnings for Drivers’, and was jointly authored with his supervisors, Prof Stephen Brewster in the School of Computing Science and Prof Frank Pollick in the School of Psychology. The work is part of Ioannis’ PhD studies into the psychology and design of multisensory warning signals for applications in driving, which is funded by the global semiconductor company Freescale.

October 3rd 2014:
£1m project sets out to find mental illness ‘fingerprint’ in brainwaves
A team of psychologists and psychiatrists are beginning research on a brainwave ‘fingerprint’ which could identify young people at risk of developing serious mental illness.
Researchers from the Universities of Glasgow and Edinburgh are looking to recruit 100 volunteers aged between 16 and 35 for a new £1m project which will measure their brain activity and examine changes in their mental state for a period of up to two years.
The researchers hope that the project could lead to an early-warning system capable of identifying people at high risk of developing psychosis before they fully manifest the symptoms, such as hallucinations or delusions.

www.your-study.org.uk

September 30th 2014:
INP/School of Psychology Research Day – Friday 10th October 2014, 09:30-16:30, Level 5 Seminar Rm The Institute of Neuroscience & Psychology and the School of Psychology will host their annual Research Day on Friday 10th October 2014. This event will take the format of a series of short presentations by senior PhD students and post-docs, highlighting the breadth of research performed across the fields of neuroscience and psychology. Presentations will cover both ongoing and novel research, including basic research and clinically motivated studies, and span from neurophysiology and anatomy to cognitive neuroimaging, psychophysics and behavioural studies in psychology. This event will provide ample opportunities for students and researchers to learn about the work of others, and will foster interactions and discussions across disciplines and research methods.

September 9th 2014:
Professors Christoph Kayser and Joachim Gross have been awarded a Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) 3-year grant to study how seeing a speakers face can make us hear better. It is well known that visual information changes the way our brain processes sounds and this affects how well we can converse in noisy acoustic environments. The project “Pathways and mechanisms underlying the visual enhancement of hearing in challenging environments” investigates the underlying neural mechanisms using combined neuroimaging (MEG) and behavioural studies to provide a better understanding of how our brain encodes what we hear and help us understand hearing deficits or enhance computer assisted communication technologies.

August 29th 2014:
Dr Rachael Jack (front, third from left) from the School of Psychology is inducted as a Member of the Royal Society of Edinburgh Young Academy of Scotland (RSE YAS).

August 29th 2014:
This year saw a record number of GU School of Psychology students taking up the opportunity of an overseas experience. This summer 19 students took part in psychology-related work experience placements in Europe as part of the Erasmus programme. A further 21 students were selected to go out on international or Erasmus exchange. We are also very pleased to welcome all of our international visiting students this year – we hope you have a great time studying Psychology here.

June 30th 2014:
Retirement of Ms Sheena McGill
Ms Sheena McGill who has worked in Psychology since 1975 is due to retire in July of this year. Sheena has been with us since the early days of student expansion, when our Honours class numbered 30, to the present, when around 180 students obtain an undergraduate degree in Psychology. During that time, she began working in the Psychology Annex in Bute Gardens then moved to her present location in Hillhead Street. There will be a celebration and presentation on her behalf on 4 July 2014 at 4 pm to be held in the Seminar Room (Level 5) in Psychology, 58 Hillhead Street. An invitation is extended to all members of the School of Psychology, Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology, and to all those who know and have worked with Sheena across the University. We hope many former colleagues will attend and we also extend them a warm welcome.

June 19th 2014:
Dr Monika Harvey with Co-investigators Dr Marie-Helene Grosbras and Professors Keith Muir and Matthew Walters has been awarded a Chief Scientist Office grant entitled: "Non-invasive brain stimulation in stroke patients". The award entails a pilot trial in patients with post-stroke spatial neglect, comparing non-invasive brain stimulation (tDCS) with behavioural (action) training, applied separately and in combination. The team will assess how tDCS changes the neglect symptoms and further investigate its impact in terms of changes to dependence and quality of life.

June 13th 2014:
Members of the INP are presenting a exhibit titled "Facing Culture" at the Glasgow Science Festival. They will be giving demonstrations of computer graphics in face research June 13-15 from 11:00-15:00 at the St Enoch Centre.

http://www.glasgowsciencefestival.org.uk/events/sciencefestival/events/allages/headline_325747_en.html

May 29th 2014:
SOUND AND VISION: VISUAL CORTEX PROCESSES AUDITORY INFORMATION TOO - Seeing is believing’, so the idiom goes, but new research suggests vision also involves a bit of hearing. Scientists studying brain process involved in sight have found the visual cortex also uses information gleaned from the ears as well as the eyes when viewing the world. They suggest this auditory input enables the visual system to predict incoming information and could confer a survival advantage. Professor Lars Muckli, who led the research, said: “Sounds create visual imagery, mental images, and automatic projections. “So, for example, if you are in a street and you hear the sound of an approaching motorbike, you expect to see a motorbike coming around the corner. If it turned out to be a horse, you’d be very surprised.” The study, published in the journal Current Biology, involved conducting five different experiments using fMRI to examine the activity in the early visual cortex in 10 volunteer subjects.
University of Glasgow Press Release

http://www.kurzweilai.net/seeing-sound-visual-cortex-processes-auditory-information-too

http://www.viralnews365.com/article/Sound-and-vision-Visual-cortex-processes-auditory-information-too-1401116049.html#.U4cSFVcUGLo

March 13th 2014:
How long do you have to make a good first impression? A new paper published in PLOS ONE, by Phil McAleer and Pascal Belin, with Alex Todorov, Princeton, US, shows that from the moment you have said ‘Hello’, people have already formed an impression of you. The study looks at situations where you can only hear a person speak but can’t see their face. From that sparse information, you have already started to make a judgement about whether you think the person is trustworthy, and whether you think they are dominant. It is suggested that such a rapid decision may have evolved from a time when the decision to approach and trust a person was crucial to survival.
Phil McAleer was interviewed live on the BBC Radio 4, PM Show with Eddie Mair on 13 March 2014.
The paper can be read here
and example voices can be listened to here.

March 10th 2014:
Congratulations to Stephany Biello (on left) and Lorna Morrow (on right) who have both received nominations within the Glasgow University Student Teaching Awards! Paddy O'Donnell has also been nominated again for an award. As these awards are across the entire University, and span every subject, this is a very significant accomplishment. It is a further testament to our strong sustained contribution to teaching that, even though these awards are very competitive, Stephany has received nominations over multiple years and Lorna's award is notable as she is also very focussed on research into university teaching.

March 5th 2014:
Sara Sereno has again been nominated by the SRC for ‘Best Teacher: Science & Engineering’. There is huge competition for this award and it is a great tribute to Sara's enthusiastic and erudite approach to student teaching that she has received multiple nominations.

December 20th 2013:
The School of Psychology and the Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging (within the Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology) are pleased to announce the availability of - MSc (1+3) and PhD (+3) studentships funded by the Economic & Social Research Council (ESRC), and - PhD (+3) scholarships from the College of Science and Engineering. Funding will be available from October 2014. Deadline for submissions is February 4, 2014. For more information please visit the Postgraduate Research Opportunities page here) and the College of Science and Engineering Scholarship/ESRC DTC scholarship page here)

November 8th 2013:
The Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging (CCNi) is hosting its annual debate on Thursday 28th November 2013 at 2pm in the Senate Room, University of Glasgow. The debate will feature 4 international experts on functional imaging, neuroanatomy and brain network dynamics debating the topic "Studies of large-scale brain networks – savior or hype". The speakers are Professor Kevan Martin (ETH Zurich), Professor Ed Bullmore (University of Cambridge), Professor Andreas Engel (Univ. Medical Center Hamburg), and Professor Kenneth Harris (Univ. College London).

CCNi Debate Flyer

Registration is now closed More info

September 23rd 2013:
The Institute of Neuroscience & Psychology and the School of Psychology will host their annual Research Day on 23 October 2013. This event will provide a series of short presentations highlighting the breadth of research performed across the fields of Neuroscience and Psychology. Presentations cover both ongoing and novel research, include both basic research and clinically motivated studies and span from neurophysiology and anatomy to cognitive neuroimaging, psychophysics and behavioural studies in psychology. This provides amply of opportunities for students and researchers to learn about the work of others and to foster interactions and discussions across disciplines and research methods.

Date & venue: Wednesday Oct 23rd, from 9.15am to 5pm, Level 5 seminar room, 58 Hillhead Street

Research Day Programme

September 11th 2013:

- Level 1 Introduction Class - Monday 23rd September @ 9am, Lecture Theatre 201, Sir Charles Wilson Building OR 5pm, Room B419, Joseph Black Building, further information can be found here
- Level 2 Introduction Class – Wednesday 18th September @ 10am-12pm, Room 203 (Lecture Theatre 1), Boyd Orr Building
- Psychological Studies (UG 3-year degree) Introduction Class – Tuesday 17th September @ 11am, 58 Hillhead Street
- Level 3 Introduction Class - Friday 20th September @ 1pm, Room 109, Gregory Building
- Level 4 Introduction Class – Friday 20th September @ 10am, Room 109, Gregory Building

June 26th 2013:
Regular exercise has health benefits. It can strengthen the body’s ‘clock’ and help it stay synchronised as it grows older. Every form of life has a ‘body clock’ that allows synchronisation of bodily functions, such as sleeping and eating, to the 24-hour light-dark cycle of the day. As organisms age, body clock circadian rhythms often become less synchronised resulting in poor sleep patterns, weakened immune function and alterations in mood. Professor Stephany Biello led research on circadian rhythms which ‘reset’ the internal body clock of mice, advancing their light/dark cycle by 8 hours. Observing how long it took for the mice’s body clocks to synchronise again, they found that young mice were able to quickly adapt to the new schedule whereas older mice struggled more. However, when older mice were given access to a running wheel, they showed stronger activity in the central brain clock and synchronised more quickly compared to older mice without a wheel. This demonstrates that voluntary exercise has an impact on circadian rhythms and this has implications for the health of older people living with environmentally-induced circadian disruption.
The paper can be found here.

June 12th 2013:
VOLUNTEERS sought for ageing research - Neuroscientists are seeking volunteers to help them in a project looking at the effects of ageing on the brain. The team from the Institute of Neurosciences and Psychology at Glasgow University are looking for men and women aged 55 and over to join the study, which involves identifying emotional states from facial expressions. Volunteers will be asked to look at a variety of animated three-dimensional faces displaying different expressions and identify the emotions being conveyed. This research is reported in the Glasgow Herald (here). To find out more or to sign up now, just email: fab4d@psy.gla.ac.uk

June 6th 2013:
Professor Muckli has recently been awarded a prestigious 5 year ERC start-up grant on ‘Brain reading of contextual feedback and predictions’. The primary goal of the proposal is detailed measures of cortical feedback, with a more ambitious objective to read mental images and inner thoughts. The motivation behind the research approach of investigating non-feedforward stimulated regions in visual cortex is highlighted in a recent review article published in Current Opinion in Neurobiology (here). These approaches link to the current debate of predictive coding published in a commentary in the latest issue of Behavioral Brain Sciences (here).

June 6th 2013:
As part of the Glasgow University Munro Challenge, a Psychology team consisting of Marc Becirspahic and Ian Bushnell displayed a Beatson t-shirt on the top of Beinn Sgritheall (3196 ft), Beinn Fhada (3386 ft) and A' Ghlas-beinn (3012 ft) on May 25th and 26th, raising £527.50 for the Beatson Pebble Appeal.

May 31st 2013:
Congratulations to Rachael Jack who has won the American Psychological Association (APA) New Investigator Award for 2013. This is based on her JEPG paper "Internal Representations Reveal Cultural Diversity in Expectations of Facial Expressions of Emotion". For a link to the paper please see here

May 8th 2013:
The independent Complete University Guide for 2014 once again places Psychology at Glasgow university in the very top flight. We are placed 5th this year out of 112 UK universities, narrowly behind Cambridge, Oxford and UCL. For the full table, please see here

May 7th 2013:
Psychology offers 2 MSc courses from the School of Psychology and an MRes course from the Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology: The MSc in BRAIN IMAGING will train you in appropriate research skills for brain imaging research, emphasising advanced methods in the field and will provide you with knowledge of advanced research in key areas of cognitive psychology and cognitive neuroscience. The MSc in RESEARCH METHODS OF PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE will provide you with both theoretical instruction and practical experience in the methods appropriate for scientific research in psychology. The MRes in BRAIN SCIENCES: FROM MOLECULES TO MIND provides opportunities for combining research training in brain imaging, psychology and neuroscience. If you are an international student intending to do a PhD in the UK, the programme serves as an excellent introduction to UK research approaches. For further details on any of these courses and a list of potential supervisors please see here

May 1st 2013:
Congratulations to Dr. Stéphanie Rossit who is the 2012 recipient of the British Psychological Society Award for OUTSTANDING DOCTORAL RESEARCH CONTRIBUTIONS TO PSYCHOLOGY for her thesis completed in Glasgow University’s School of Psychology entitled ‘Action and Rehabilitation in Hemispatial Neglect’. The work was performed under the supervision of Dr. Monika Harvey and funded by the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology and Social European Fund (FCT, No: SFRH/BD/23230/2005). The award will be presented at the Annual BPS Conference in Birmingham in 2014. For further details please see here. For a list of past winners, see here

April 18th 2013:
Professor Frank Pollick and a team of researchers in the School of Computing Science (Dr Yashar Moshfeghi, Luisa Pinto, Professor Joemon Jose) won the Best Paper award at this year's European Conference on Information Retrieval for their paper "Understanding Relevance: An fMRI Study" See here for more information and see here for an interview with the first author describing the paper. This research combined techniques of computing science and psychology to discover what parts of the brain have greater activation when we find an image that is relevant to our search needs. The goal of the research is to better understand brain mechanisms of how we evaluate the results of information search for use in developing new generations of technology for information retrieval.

March 19th 2013:
Once again (as in the inaugural year 2012), 3 members of our psychology staff were shortlisted for the Student Teaching Awards. Sara Sereno - Best Teacher Science and Engineering, Stephany Biello - Best Research Supervisor, and Rob Jenkins - Most Innovative Teaching A brief ceremony took place in the Randolph Hall, on Friday 15th March. It was organised by SRC and attended by Professor Frank Coton (Vice Principal Learning and Teaching Vice Principal).

March 8th 2013:
Congratulations to Dr Stéphanie Rossit who is the 2012 recipient of the British Psychological Society Award for OUTSTANDING DOCTORAL RESEARCH CONTRIBUTIONS TO PSYCHOLOGY for her thesis entitled 'Action and Rehabilitation in Hemispatial Neglect'. The work was performed under the supervision of Dr. Monika Harvey and funded by the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology and Social European Fund (FCT, No: SFRH/BD/23230/2005). The award will be presented at the Annual BPS Conference in Birmingham in 2014 with an announcement to be made in The Psychologist. For a list of past winners, see here.

March 8th 2013:
Many congratulations to the Level 1 and 2 Psychology students who were awarded Certificates of Academic Achievement for earning an A grade in semester 1. The certificates were presented by the L1 and 2 Course Tutors, Drs Jason Bohan and Lorna Morrow, at a reception in the School’s seminar room where Director of Teaching, Prof Stephany Biello, welcomed the students and congratulated them on their achievement. The Certificates were introduced this year as a way of formally recognising and rewarding hard working students for their sustained excellence during the semester.

January 21st 2013:
Professor Patrick O'Donnell was interviewd by The Telegraph on the subject of Lance Armstrong's interview with Oprah Winfrey. The disgraced cyclist's expressions of "sorrow and regret" are undermined by revealing smiles, according to Professor O'Donnell. More information can be found here.

January 18th 2013:
Congratulations to Dr Rob Jenkins, who has been awarded an Invitation Fellowship (Long-Term) from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS). The funding will allow him to spend 3 consecutive months in Kyoto conducting research with Prof Sakiko Yoshikawa.

December 20th 2012:
Rob Jenkins has been selected for membership in the Global Young Academy (GYA) - the voice of young scientists around the world. The 172 current members include leading young scientists from 54 countries and all continents. Four of the current members are based in the UK. Rob is the first UK psychologist to be selected for the GYA. More information can be found here.

December 17th 2012:
The School of Psychology and the Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging (within the Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology) are pleased to announce the availability of:

- MSc (1+3) and PhD (+3) studentships funded by the Economic & Social Research Council (ESRC), and
- PhD (+3) scholarships from the College of Science and Engineering.

Funding will be available from October 2013. Deadline for submissions are January 31, 2013.

For more information please visit the Postgraduate Research Opportunities page and the College of Science and Engineering Scholarship/ ESRC DTC scholarship page.

December 14th 2012:
Monday blues explain why patients miss hospital and GP appointments. Significant health and financial savings could be achieved by changing schedules, say Dr Rob Jenkins and David Ellis in PLoS One. “If you could cut non-attendance by just a tenth – from 12% to 10.8%, you could save the NHS £60 million a year,” says Dr Jenkins. David Ellis concludes: “Our study clearly shows that appointments at the beginning of the week are missed more often than those at the end of the week. “A simple strategy for reducing missed appointments could be to schedule appointments towards the end of the week wherever possible.” A summary can be found here.

October 12th 2012:
Professors Joachim Gross and Gregor Thut have been awarded a prestigious Wellcome Trust Joint Investigator Award for a project entitled: 'Natural and modulated neural communication: State-dependent decoding and driving of human brain oscillations'. They will be working in partnership to understand aspects of rhythmic network activity in the human brain. As part of this research, they plan to develop and use methodologies to decode and change brain communication by means of MEG/EEG and non-invasive brain stimulation. They seek to understand how the oscillatory network activity gives rise to the complexity and efficiency of human behaviour and to explore to what extent this activity can be controlled by brain stimulation in the healthy and diseased brain.

September 11th 2012:

INDUCTION FOR STUDENTS ARRIVING IN SEPTEMBER 2012
Induction will be between 10am and 12pm or between 2pm and 4pm on Friday 14 September in the Boyd Orr building, room LT-D. The times and places for the psychology enrolment and induction sessions, and more information, are available here.

August 21st 2012:
Rachael Jack, University Teacher in the School of Psychology has been awarded a prestigious 3-year "Future Research Leaders" grant from ESRC. The Future Research Leaders scheme aims to support outstanding early career researchers to carry out excellent research and to develop all aspects of their research and knowledge exchange skills. The research will investigate the complexities of cross-cultural emotion communication using a cross-disciplinary approach involving psychophysics (reverse correlation), computer graphics (4-D structural imaging), statistical modelling, and hierarchical cluster analysis.

August 7th 2012:
Dr Rob Jenkins, senior lecturer in the School of Psychology "was recognised for his outstanding scientific creativity, the inter- disciplinary reach of his research and his passion for science communication" by the award of the Royal Society of Edinburgh's RSE Prize. The RSE/Makdougall Brisbane Medal, recognising achievements of early career researchers in the physical sciences, was jointly awarded. The press release can be found here.

June 29th 2012:
Psychology graduation took place in the Bute Hall on the 27th June. At a School of Psychology reception beforehand, students and their parents were addressed by Prof Paddy O'Donnell and prizes were awarded to our top students, some of whom are shown in this photo - from left to right are Ailsa Morison, Fiona Provan, Julia Gillard, Aliyah Rehman, Anna Sierka, Sasskia Bruers and Mhairi McDonald.

May 24th 2012:
Psychology at Glasgow University has been placed fourth equal in the table of 109 UK Psychology departments in the Guardian University Guide 2013 (just behind UCL, Cambridge and Oxford and level with Bath). We are especially proud of being by far the most highly rated Psychology department in Scotland but even more proud of our "value-added" rating of 10-out-of-10. This rating shows how much we help our students attain final degree grades that are much higher than would be expected from entry qualifications. The full table of results can be found here.

April 19th 2012:
The GU Recruitment and International Office is calling all international students and asking them to say what they think about the University of Glasgow in terms of learning, support and life in general. As a thank you, they are offering five lucky students the chance to win £200! Simply take five minutes to fill out the following International Student Barometer survey for a chance to win. The survey can be found here

April 2nd 2012:
Nicola Van Rijsbergen received the 'Best Dissertation Supervisor' award at the Annual Glasgow University Student Teaching Awards event. More than 300 university lecturers were nominated and this success was an excellent achievement.

March 29th 2012:
Professor Paddy O'Donnell featured on BBC news on the 28th March, letting us know that a short spell of sunshine was not likely to change the mood of the nation.

March 27th 2012:
Dr Bo Yao was interviewed live on BBC Radio 4 about his recent work on how the 'brain talks over boring stuff'. The audio clip is here and the study is also reported here. The research was conducted by Dr Yao with colleagues Professor Pascal Belin and Professor Christoph Scheepers within the Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology’s Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging.

March 27th 2012:
The Annual Glasgow University Student Teaching Awards event was hosted by the SRC in the Senate Room on 23rd March. The School of Psychology was nominated in three categories and Rob Jenkins picked up the prize for Innovation in Teaching.

March 27th 2012:
During Brain Awareness week (12-18 March 2012), 800 enthusiastic budding scientists from Glasgow and surrounding schools have enjoyed presentations and workshops letting them explore the wonders of the human brain. Teachers, parents and children have warmly commented on the success of this event. Thanks to all the post-graduates from the School of Psychology and Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology who got involved!

March 8th 2012:
The School of Psychology hosted the largest undergraduate conference held in the UK. The 2012 British Psychological Society Undergraduate Conference on 17th March saw 300 students from across the UK attending, with 70 papers and keynotes from Carole Allan (BPS President) and Rob Jenkins who delivered a very entertaining and thought-provoking address.

March 6th 2012:
There is a highly informative scientific profile of our Head of School and Head of Institute in a Q&A item in the current issue of Current Biology which can be found here.

February 21st 2012:
AQM Postgraduate Funding 2012 The School of Psychology and the Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging (within the Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology) are pleased to announce the availability of PhD studentships in Advanced Quantitative Methods (AQM). Funding will be available from October 2012.










Eligibility
We invite applications from students from the UK or EU countries as well as international/ overseas candidates.

Application Process
Students should make an application to study through the online application system stating their interest in AQM Psychology funding. Applications should include:
- a CV and two academic references
- a research proposal (maximum 1200 words, outlining the relevance/use of AQM) with a named supervisor
- an academic transcript

Questions
Should you have any questions regarding this funding opportunity, please contact Lynda Young (lynda.young@glasgow.ac.uk)

Deadline: Friday 23rd March 2012

February 14th 2012:
ESRC Postgraduate Funding 2012 The School of Psychology and the Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging (within the Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology) are pleased to announce the availability of MSc (1+3) and PhD (+3) studentships funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). Funding will be available from October 2012.










Eligibility
Applicants must be students from the UK or EU countries and satisfy the eligibility criteria of the ESRC. Research topics should be based in the following areas:

Psychology Pathway
Two ESRC doctoral studentships are available in the Psychology Pathway of the ESRC Scottish Doctoral Training Centre.
Psychology at Glasgow is part of the research training pathways that forms part of the ESRC Scottish Doctoral Training Centre. Programmes available at the University of Glasgow include the PhD in Psychology (+3 studentships), or 1+3 studentships beginning with:

MSc Psychological Research Methods
MSc in Brain Imaging

Language-Based Pathways
Two ESRC doctoral studentships are available in the Language-based Pathways of the ESRC Scottish Doctoral Training Centre. Programmes available at the University of Glasgow include PhD's in Psychology (+3 studentships), or 1+3 studentships beginning with:

MSc in Brain Imaging

Application Process
Students should make an application to study through the online application system stating their interest in ESRC Psychology or Language funding. Applications should include:
- a CV and two academic references
- a research proposal (maximum 1200 words) with a named supervisor
- an academic transcript

Questions
Should you have any questions regarding this funding opportunity, please contact Lynda Young (lynda.young@glasgow.ac.uk)

Deadline: Friday 23rd March 2012

September 7th 2011:
Rob Jenkins has been recently accepted as a member of the Royal Society of Edinburgh Young Academy of Scotland. This group of young researchers is likely to play an important role in science policy in Scotland in the future.

August 30th 2011:
Level 3 Induction Class is on Thursday 15th September at 11am, in room G255 of the main University building.

August 30th 2011:
Psychological Studies Induction Class is on Thursday 15th September at 10am, Seminar Room, 58 Hillhead Street.

August 30th 2011:
Level 4 Induction Class is on Friday 16th September at 10am in Room 375, James Watt Building.

April 7th 2011:
Pascal Belin, Marie-Helene Grosbras and Guillaume Rousselet have been awarded a £216K MRC grant running over 18 months. The funding is part of the Lifelong Health and Wellbeing (LLHW) scheme, a major cross-council initiative supporting multi-disciplinary research addressing factors across the life course that influence healthy ageing and wellbeing in later life. The research will investigate lifelong changes in the cerebral processing of social signals using fMRI.

April 7th 2011:
Lars Muckli and Fraser Smith have been getting considerable public exposure for their work on how the human brain actively predicts what input it will receive. To quote from Dr Muckli - "We are continuously anticipating what we will see, hear or feel next. If parts of an image are obstructed we still have precise expectation of what the whole object will look like." More information is available on the University's web site at the link (here) and there is a BBC2 Scotland Newsdrive interview (here)

March 24th 2011:
Our own Stephanie Connell (undergraduate and postgraduate in Psychology recently competed in the British Universities and Colleges Sport championships in Karate and won the Women's Kata Senior Gold medal for Glasgow University.

March 17th 2011:
The Glasgow University Researcher Development Committee has awarded funding to David Ellis in Psychology and Michael Comerford at Computing Science for their application 'Encouraging Interdisciplinary Research Between Early Career Researchers'. They will be developing and hosting a conference based on a research council's theme/strategic aim.

March 16th 2011:
Postgraduate Funding 2011:
The School of Psychology and the Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging (within the Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology) are pleased to announce the availability of MSc (1+3) and PhD (+3) studentships funded by the Economic & Social Research Council (ESRC). Funding will be available from September 2011.

More information here.










Eligibility - Applicants must be students from the UK or EU countries and satisfy the eligibility criteria of the ESRC. Research topics should be based in the following three areas: Psychology Pathway - At least two ESRC doctoral studentships are available in the Psychology Pathway of the ESRC Scottish Doctoral Training Centre. Psychology is one of the research training pathways that forms part of the ESRC Scottish Doctoral Training Centre. ESRC 1+3 and +3 studentships in Psychology are available at the Universities of Aberdeen, Edinburgh, Glasgow and St Andrews. Potential applicants to Glasgow should follow the instructions below in order to be considered. Programmes available at the University of Glasgow include the PhD in Psychology (+3 studentships), or 1+3 studentships beginning with: • MSc Psychological Research Methods • MSc in Brain Imaging Language-Based Pathways - At least two ESRC doctoral studentships available in Language-based Pathways of the ESRC Scottish Doctoral Training Centre. Language Sciences and Social and Applied Investigations in Language (SAIL) are research training pathways that form part of the ESRC Scottish Doctoral Training Centre. ESRC 1+3 and +3 studentships in the pathways are available at the Universities of Aberdeen, Edinburgh, Glasgow and St Andrews. Potential applicants to Glasgow should follow the instructions below in order to be considered. Programmes available at the University of Glasgow include PhD's in Psychology (+3 studentships), or 1+3 studentships beginning with:: Language Sciences • MSc in Brain Imaging Application Process - Students should make an application to study through the online application system which can be viewed here stating their interest in ESRC Psychology or Language funding. Applications should include: • a CV and two academic references; • a research proposal with a named supervisor • an academic transcript Questions Should you have any questions regarding this funding opportunity, please contact Lynda Young (lynda.young@glasgow.ac.uk) Deadline: Friday 15th April 2011

March 12th 2011:
Frank Pollick and Lawrie McKay from Glasgow together with Kerri Johnson from UCLA have raised huge media interest in their recent Cognition article 'He Throws Like a Girl (But Only When He's Sad): Emotion Affects Sex-Decoding of Biological Motion Displays'. Their study demonstrated gender stereotypes. Body language was more likely to be judged as masculine when it seemed to convey anger and as feminine when is seemed to convey sadness. Frank Pollick videotaped male and female actors throwing baseballs in a style that conveyed a range of emotions. Using technology to disguise the actors' sex, the researchers presented the videos to observers and asked them to make judgments about the throwers' emotions and gender. With minimal information, observers discerned the thrower's emotion but there was good evidence that prior beliefs and stereotypes can lead to systematic errors in the normally accurate perception of body motions.

March 11th 2011:
Gregor Thut, Joachim Gross and Philippe Schyns have been awarded a £460K BBSRC grant running over 3 years. This research will investigate how direct interactions with brain oscillations shape visual attention and perception. It relies on multimodal neuroimaging combining psychophysics, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electro-and magnetoencephalography (EEG or MEG).

January 25th 2011:
Congratulations to Simon Garrod and Tony Sanford who have been awarded the prestigious Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award, 2011, from the Society for Text and Discourse! Quoting from the award letter: "This is the Society's most prestigious award, which honors scholars who have made outstanding scientific contributions to the study of discourse processing and text analysis. Previous awards winners were Walter Kintsch, Herb Clark and Art Graesser" (here) or (here).

January 21st 2011:
Congratulations to Mike Burton, who has been awarded one of the most prestigious prizes in experimental psychology - the EPS Mid-Career Award (here). As you can see from the EPS website, the annual award was established to recognise a psychologist who has a distinguished research record over a substantial period. It recognises breadth of research achievement, and contribution to the advancement of experimental psychology.

December 16th 2010:
Christoph Scheepers (Glasgow) and Yuki Kamide (Dundee) have been awarded a £430K ESRC grant to investigate dynamic mental representations of motion events in sentence processing. The project will employ a post-doc and a project-related PhD student for 3 years. Using a combination of eye-tracking, cross-modal priming, and visual change detection paradigms, the project aims at finding out how mental representations of linguistically described motion events (throwing, pushing, rolling, etc.) dynamically unfold over time, as well as how detailed and task-dependent such representations are.

December 16th 2010:
The Leverhulme Trust has awarded the University of Glasgow a research grant of £78,097 over 2 years to study perceived 3D trajectories of line motion. The research project will be undertaken by Martin Lages and not by or for the Trust. This research will extend work with Suzanne Heron recently published in PLoS Computational Biology (doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000999)

December 9th 2010:
Dr Klaus Kessler has received £100k from ESRC to play with Dr Who (see picture) for another year, but this time in the MEG. For those who have not participated in one of these experiments, the Dr Who action figurine is used as an avatar in Klaus' visuo-spatial perspective taking experiments. Recently, Klaus and his colleagues revealed that we mentally simulate or emulate a rotation of our body to adopt someone else's perspective (Kessler & Thomson, 2010; Kessler & Rutherford, 2010). MEG will allow the research team to determine the coupling oscillatory networks in the brain, shedding light on the particulars of the mental rotation mechanism.

December 3rd 2010:
David Ellis has been awarded a postgraduate Internship by the Economic and Social Research Council/The Scottish Government Internship Initiative. His project will involve analysing data from the first NHS Scotland Patient Experience Inpatients Survey. David will carry out a secondary analysis of the survey data and produce a written report on key findings from the analysis. He will assist Scottish Government analysts with the development and roll-out of the 2010/11 survey for NHS Scotland. The project will offer the opportunity to work with a range of users within the Scottish Government and NHS Scotland.

November 24th 2010:
Lukasz Piwek has won an ESRC Postgraduate Internship to work for 3 months with the UK Border Agency. The title of the project is 'A rapid review of evidence on identifying suspicious behaviour in ports and airports through behavioural analysis'. Over that time he will be working in London in the Research & Development Section of the UK Border Agency in order to provide a clear and relevant review of the published research evidence base for policy and operational colleagues within the UK Border Agency. This evidence could either directly inform options for operational activity in this area or may identify evidence gaps requiring further original research.

October 6th 2010:
Luca Vizioli, Guillaume A. Rousselet and Roberto Caldara do not look alike! However, they have discovered the first neurophysiological evidence of the 'all look alike' perceptual experience for other-race faces (i.e., all East-Asian faces all look alike for Westerners and vice-versa for Easterners). This challenge was achieved with a novel electrophysiological approach based on the computation of single-trial Repetition Suppression responses. These findings will be published soon in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

September 24th 2010:
Rosie Begbie and Sarah Gunn were jointly awarded the Alastair Weir Prize for Excellence in Level 3 Psychology. Rosie received her cheque from Professor O'Donnell at a recent event.

August 10th 2010:
Joachim Gross and Gregor Thut have been awarded £250,000 over 3 years by the Wellcome Trust to study the neural mechanisms of sensory awareness. Specifically, the contribution of oscillatory brain activity to perception and attention will be investigated using MEG and TMS.

July 8th 2010:
Congratulations to Dr Steve Draper who was recently awarded a Teaching Excellence Award by the Principal of the university for his sterling work on innovations in teaching. Steve has also recently obtained grants approximating £20,000 for developing his ideas on effective teaching.

July 8th 2010:
The Leverhulme Trust has awarded the University of Glasgow a research grant of £116,899 over 3 years to study the "effects of age, luminance and pupil size on retinal and cortical processing speed." The research project will be undertaken by Guillaume Rousselet and not by or for the Trust.

June 29th 2010:
This year saw a very strong academic performance from our final honours students. Shown here are a number of our prize-winners with Head of Department Mike Burton. Starting from the left - Laura Pidgeon, Kacper Wieczorek, Richard Kunert and Clare Sutherland. The prizes awarded were as follows: Henry J Watt Prize for best overall student - shared by Clare Sutherland and Laura Pidgeon; Pickford Prize for the best student in Social psychology - Cleo Barrable; BPS prize for the best undergraduate overall - Clare Sutherland; Ede and Ravenscroft prize for best final year student in the Faculty of Information Sciences - Clare Sutherland; Thouless prize for the best critical review - shared by Richard Kunert and Kacper Wieczorek

May 20th 2010:
Congratulations to Dr Lorna Morrow, Dr Paul Bishop and Dr Steve Draper who each received an award from the FELT fund whose remit is to assist projects that will enhance learning and teaching.

May 20th 2010:
Dr Guillaume Rousselet and Dr Carl Gaspar in the Department of Psychology, along with colleagues in Edinburgh and Canada, studied how healthy aging affects the time course of face visual processing. They report data from 62 healthy adults, aged between 19 and 98, suggesting lower signal-to-noise ratios in older brains, as well as an estimated 1 ms / year delay in face sensitivity. The results also suggest a qualitative change from a young to an older pattern of brain activity at around 47±4 years old. The article is published in the new journal Frontiers in Perception Science and can be viewed here.

April 27th 2010:
Professor Philippe Schyns has published his first editorial in the new publication Frontiers in Perception Science. "Grand challenges in perception science: modeling the future" can be viewed here.

April 7th 2010:
Professor Joachim Gross has been awarded the prestigious Sam Williamson prize at the International Conference for Biomagnetism for his outstanding contribution to the field of MEG research.

March 29th 2010:
The Voice Neurocognition Laboratory headed by Prof Pascal Belin recently published a paper in Current Biology demonstrating that voice averaging increases the perceived attractiveness of a voice. Participants significantly preferred voices which contained an increasing number of voice composites compared to the original voices that these composites were constructed from. The reason for this increase in attractiveness ratings with vocal averaging seems to be a smoother voice texture as well as a closer resemblance to the vocal prototype. The research received media coverage from Radio BBC4 and BBC Scotland.

March 26th 2010:
'Remembering the future: Visual cortex saves energy by predicting what it will see' - Lars Muckli from our Department (in collaboration with the Max-Planck Institute) has discovered that the brain saves energy by predicting what it is likely to see. The visual cortex does not simply react to visual stimuli but proactively predicts what it is likely to see in any given context – for example, within familiar environments such as your house or office. By doing so it uses less energy to process images, but if something unexpected were to appear in that familiar environment, the visual cortex becomes more active in order to process this information. "Imagine your desk in your office," said lead researcher Dr Lars Muckli. "You’ve seen it a million times so your brain knows what it looks like so it doesn’t need to spend lots of time processing the scene. It already has a mental image of it and so the brain predicts that this is what it will see before you walk into the room. However, if you were to walk in to your office one day and see someone totally unexpected sitting in your chair – the Prime Minister, for example, your brain would have to work harder to process the same scene." The paper, 'Stimulus Predictability Reduces Responses in Primary Visual Cortex', was published in the Journal of Neuroscience.

March 17th 2010:
The Department of Psychology and CCNi have launched an exciting new MSc in Brain Imaging. WHAT IS IT: This 12 month course covers the use of brain imaging techniques using on-site fMRi, ERP and EEG, MEG, and TMS. WHO IS IT FOR?: For graduates of all relevant disciplines e.g. Psychology, Mathematics, Statistics, Computing Science, Engineering, Biological Sciences. CAREER OPPORTUNITIES: Prepares students for research in scientific and clinical careers. IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN APPLYING : Please e-mail our administrator with a brief (50 word) CV and the areas of research you are interested in. We will send you an application form and information on scholarships and fees reductions - k.pirie@psy.gla.ac.uk The CCNi webpages can be viewed here.

March 17th 2010:
The CCNi Social Interactions Project hosted an event entitled 'The Science of Social Interaction' in collaboration with Glasgow Science Centre as part of the UK-wide ESRC Festival of Social Science. The purpose of the event was to showcase the psychology of first impressions and their consequences, and involved exhibits by three Project Investigators from the Department of Psychology: Roberto Caldara, Jamie Hillis and Rob Jenkins.

March 2nd 2010:
Congratulations to Jason Bohan who has just been awarded a British Academy grant for a project entitled, "The Effect of Reader's Mood on Semantic Anomaly Detection." This research will investigate whether a reader's mood state affects the style of processing they adopt whilst reading short stories.

February 23rd 2010:
Rachel Jack's work on facial expression and culture has received coverage in a recent edition of the Discovery Channel Magazine. To quote from Rachel, "Westerners look at the eyes and mouth in equal measure whereas Easterners favour the eyes and neglect the mouth," The eye movements of subjects were tracked while they looked at faces showing a variety of expressions. Rachel suggests that East Asians may try to suppress displays of emotion, which leads to expression via the eyes rather than mouth. "The muscles around the eye region are less easily controlled than the mouth," she says, "it's possible East Asians focus on the eye region because it might leak tell-tale signs of how someone is feeling."

February 23rd 2010:
Joachim Gross has been awarded the Senior Fellowship Award from the Zukunftskolleg, University of Konstanz for excellence in research. The recognition is based on an outstanding research record, documented by publications and awards.

January 29th 2010:
Prof. Philippe Schyns is editing an exciting new journal entitled 'Frontiers in Perception Science' which is a specialty section of Frontiers in Psychology and is devoted to understanding perception from an interdisciplinary perspective. It aims to provide an interactive forum for cutting-edge thoughts, models and experimental studies of the mechanisms of perception, and for promoting an integrative interdisciplinary approach.

January 29th 2010:
Lars Muckli is the Scientific Co-ordinator for a major CCNI debate on the topic: Does BOLD fMRI reveal Pseudo Neuronal Activity? Discussants include Prof. Philippe Schyns (Glasgow), Prof. Aniruddha Das (Columbia), Dr Ahalya Viswanathan (Max Planck), Prof Martin Lauritzen (Glostrup Hospital, Denmark) and Prof. Nikos Logothetis (Max Planck).

January 22nd 2010:
The Admin staff in the Department raised over £480 for Haiti with an inspired selection of home baking.

October 22nd 2009:
Robert Winston visited the department in October to film footage for the BBC's flagship science programme, A Child Of Our Time. Researchers Rob Jenkins, David Simmons, and Oliver Garrod used the department's face modelling facilities to analyse subtle differences between the faces of identical twins. But how can genetically identical twins be different? And how might personality relate to appearance? To find out, tune in to the BBC's 10th Anniversary special of A Child Of Our Time, to be broadcast in April 2010.

October 15th 2009:
The Glasgow Science Centre recently hosted a Homecoming Scotland 'Meet the Scientist for our Celebration of Scottish Science' event involving both researchers and students from our Department over the weekend. As part of the year long 2009 Homecoming Scotland events programme, the Glasgow Science Centre (GSC) put on a uniquely Scottish theme involving pipes, tartan, haggis, and dolly the sheep. Our researchers were at hand to raise awareness, answer questions, and to broadcast a number of the contemporary findings that are currently being produced by the Department. Visitors to the GSC were also asked to become involved in the research. One stand, from the department, was devoted to Sleep Research and Circadian Timing. In which, adults had the opportunity to discover their individual diurnal preference (if a person is more of a morning or evening typed person). This was achieved through the use of an online version of the Horne & Ostberg Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire. Morning type people were given Lark certificates and Evening type people were given Owl certificates. Kids also had the chance to learn more about the brain by making neurons out of colourful pipe cleaners, colouring in the brain, and by taking part in sleep related worksheets. Derek Shirlaw, the Public Engagement Champion for the GSC, commented on the success of the event by thanking those involved from the Department and by suggesting future occasions for public engagement. Quoting from Derek: “I'm hoping for many more opportunities like this across universities and other organisations involved in public engagement. I'm starting to think about how we can build upon this particular celebration of Scottish science event for next year.”

September 25th 2009:
GSC-Psychology Summer Studentship. Rob Jenkins has initiated a fantastic link between our Department and the Glasgow Science Centre (GSC). Prof. Mike Burton can be seen in the front of this photograph at a meeting to arrange for our students to take up a summer research residency in the GSC. This will allow our students to gain access to over 400,000 visitors who then become potential research participants. Quoting from Rob: "Some psychological research is best conducted outside of the lab. This initiative provides a unique opportunity for students to get out there and run experiments in a public setting. It enables students to undertake research projects that would otherwise be out of reach, and GSC is always keen to have real science taking place on site ... Glasgow Science Centre does a fantastic job of demystifying science and exposing the process of scientific discovery. Teaming up with them is another way of giving something back to the public who, at the end of the day, fund our research. If we can help to get people interested in science, then I’m all for it ... The student benefits twice over. Not only do they get excellent research experience, they also get experience in communicating science to non-specialists. Public engagement is increasingly important, so the scholarship is a real asset to the recipient when it comes to the job market." The university publicity can be viewed here

September 23rd 2009:
Clare Sutherland and Anna Dzieciol were joint winners of the Alastair Weir Prize for excellence in Part One Finals examinations (2009). They received cash prizes from Prof Mike Burton (HoD) at a ceremony in the Department.

September 16th 2009:
Ian Charest has received a Value In People Award from the Wellcome Trust. The broad aim of this award is to help universities in the recruitment, career progression and retention of key academic and research staff. He receives 6 months funding following on from submission of his Ph.D.

September 10th 2009:
Dr Guillaume Rousselet and his team in the Department of Psychology have shown that aging has a negative impact on face recognition. They studied the electrical activity of the brains of young (mean age 22) and old (mean age 70) people as a series of pictures of two different faces were shown to them which had varying levels of 'noise' in them. The researchers were able to precisely quantify a processing speed delay of 47 milliseconds (ms), around 10ms for every extra decade from the age of 20. At 98-years-old, Ken, pictured wearing a 256 electrode EEG net to record electrical brain activity on the scalp surface, is the oldest participant in the study. (Photo Credit JD Howell). Face processing produces a signal in the visual cortex of the brain, which peaks at 170ms after presentation of a face – resulting in this signal being called the N170. In the young a strong N170 response was more closely associated with the appearance of faces, whilst in older subjects it also occurred in response to noise, perhaps implying a reduced ability to differentiate faces from noise in older brains. Dr Rousselet said: “Very few studies have attempted to measure the effect of ageing on the time-course of visual processing in response to complex stimuli like faces. We found that, as well as an overall reduction in speed in the elderly, one particular component of the response to a face – the N170 – is less sensitive to faces in the elderly.” “Our data supports the common belief that as we get older we get slower. Beyond this general conclusion, our research provides new tools to quantify by how much the brain slows down in the particular context of face perception.” “Now, we need to identify the reasons for the speed reduction and for the heterogeneity of the effects – indeed, why the brains of some older subjects seem to tick as fast as the brains of some young subjects is at this point a complete mystery”. The paper is published in the open access journal BMC Neuroscience and can be viewed here

August 24th 2009:
Rachael Jack's research that suggests that people from different cultures read facial expressions differently has received extensive international press coverage and turned out to be the most read and most shared item on the BBC News website. Rachel is quoted - "Interestingly, although the eye region is ambiguous, subjects tended to bias their judgements towards less socially-threatening emotions - surprise rather than fear, for example. This perhaps highlights cultural differences when it comes to the social acceptability of emotions." This difference in perception is also reflected in the differences between Eastern and Western emoticons - the typographical characters used to convey emotions in e-mails. The Eastern emoticons are not only the right way up but focus on the eyes, whilst in the West the mouth is important.

July 29th 2009:
Congratulations to Sara Sereno, Guillaume Rousselet, and Cyril Pernet for their new £275,000, two-year ESRC grant: "Fluent reading and the brain: Co-registration and statistical decomposition of eye fixations and anatomically-based lectrophysiology." The grant also includes money for grid use and scanning time. This was the first grant to have received the new departmental incentive bonus.

July 28th 2009:
Professor Tony Sanford has just been recognised as a Fellow of the Society for Text and Discourse. This award is for his sustained outstanding contributions to the science of this field. The significance of this is evidenced by the fact that Fellows must show that they have enriched or advanced their field on a scale well beyond that of being a good researcher, practitioner, teacher, or supervisor. Not only must the contribution and/or performance be outstanding, it must also have had impact that is recognized broadly in the U.S. and/or internationally.

July 20th 2009:
Dr Lars Muckli in the Department of Psychology's Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging has just published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science a very exciting article about research with a 10-year-old girl born with half a brain who is able to see normally through one eye. The child, from Germany, has both fields of vision in one eye and is the only known case of its kind in the world. Dr Lars Muckli said: "This study has revealed the surprising flexibility of the brain when it comes to self-organising mechanisms for forming visual maps." "The brain has amazing plasticity but we were quite astonished to see just how well the single hemisphere of the brain in this girl has adapted to compensate for the missing half."

July 14th 2009:
Glasgow University psychologists provided a very substantial contribution to the recent Human Brain Mapping conference in San Francisco with more than 25 presentations being made. Two of these papers were selected as conference highlights - Gregor Thut and Vincenzo Rome “Spatially and frequency specific biasing of visual detection through rhythmic TMS over occipito-parietal sites: Evidence for a causal role of posterior alpha-oscillations in sensory selection” and Fraser W Smith & Lars Muckli “Can Non-Stimulated Regions of Early Visual Cortex Predict Scene Category?”

July 14th 2009:
Guillaume Rousselet was one of the authors of a recent paper on dyslexia which was covered by the press and featured on the BBC website where it can be viewed here as well as on other websites where the original message was not always very accurate, for example in the Scotsman here. The original paper can be found here

July 3rd 2009:
Almudena Capilla has been granted a PhD 'Extraordinary Award' by the Faculty of Psychology of the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM). This award indicates a very high quality of thesis and excellent academic progression. Her thesis title is 'Development and brain dynamics of cognitive control processes'.

July 1st 2009:
Honours student Mable Nakubulwa is working on a project investigating the level 1 psychology student experience in the lab teaching environment with Judith Stevenson and Maxine Swingler. The project is funded by a FELT (Faculty Education Learning and Teaching) award from FIMS to promote effective teaching-learning environments and student retention.

June 18th 2009:
BPS- and EPS-funded undergraduate scholar Clare Sutherland presented the Belladonna illusion to a public audience at the Glasgow University Science Festival on June 14th. The illusion shows that the appearance of other people's eyes (pupil size) is important in forming first impressions.

June 8th 2009:
Rob Jenkins was recently interviewed by Steve Russell, chairman of American security firm 3VR Security, about face recognition and surveillance. The interview can be viewed here or here.

June 5th 2009:
Third year honours psychology students have been very successful in competitions for summer research funding and internships - Dionysia Mexa, Sarah Breustedt and Jessica Wainman-Lefley (Nuffield); Christine Macleod, Aline Scherff, Kacper Wieczorek, Michael Stoker, Anna Dzieciol and Richard Kunert (Wellcome); Clare Sutherland, Chris Benwell and Kerry Ann Ross (Carnegie); Clare Sutherland (EPS).

April 30th 2009:
Kerry Kilborn is part of an international consortium of 10 research labs in the US, Canada, and Scotland that has obtained $2.7m from the National Institutes of Health for a project entitled - "Neural ElectroMagnetic Ontologies: ERP Knowledge Representation & Integration (NEMO)". Electro-encephalography (EEG) and event-related potentials (ERP) are venerable techniques for cognitive and clinical research on human brain function. To realize their full potential, however, it is necessary to address some long-standing challenges in conducting large-scale comparison and integration of results across experiments and research laboratories. The NEMO consortium will develop an integrated tool environment for storage and management of EEG and ERP data and meta-data, measure generation and labeling, ontology development, and meta-analysis. This environment will be web-accessible so that partners will have shared access to the project data, analysis tools, ontologies, and meta-analysis results. At the end of this project, the ontologies, annotated database, tools, and technologies will be made available to the larger research community. A prototype web portal, including examples of ERP data, can be viewed here.

April 27th 2009:
Sara Sereno from our Department has recently been recognised by her alma mater. Northern Illinois University (NIU), in a milestone anniversary of its founding, is presenting The Sereno Family with the Outstanding Alumni Award for the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (ceremony April 23, 2009). Sara's mother first attended NIU in the evenings to obtain a Masters in Art Education (1976) while raising the family and teaching. All 6 of the children attended NIU and received Bachelor's degrees. They all continued in academia, obtaining Ph.D.s and are all currently working as senior academics at US and UK universities. Apart from one brother who is a paleontologist, they are all pursuing research in exploring brain function in the areas of vision and language. View Chicago Tribune front page article here, NIU story here and biographical information here

April 27th 2009:
Christoph Scheepers (University of Glasgow, photo) and Fernanda Ferreira (University of Edinburgh) have recently been awarded a substantial ESRC research grant worth £395,676 on "Get-versus be-passives in English: A functional investigation". The goal is to conduct a thorough empirical investigation of the factors that promote or restrict the use of passive voice sentences in English, with a particular focus on the different forms that a passive can take. The project will employ a range of different methodologies, from corpus-linguistic methods to psycholinguistic paradigms such as syntactic priming and eye-tracking.

April 2nd 2009:
Kerry Kilborn has generated a spinout company: Diagnostic Potentials Ltd. which uses cognitive neuroscience technologies (in particular high resolution EEG) to meet unmet clinical needs in the diagnosis and treatment of central nervous system disorders. The first product is a clinical test to help doctors accurately diagnose Alzheimer's disease at an early stage, when treatment can provide the greatest benefit to patients. In recent years the company has received support from the Scottish government, the Wellcome Trust, the Translational Medicine Research Collaboration, Scottish Enterprise, and private investors. These achievements have been recognized along the way with various awards, including SMART:Scotland, the Great Scot Award in Science and Medicine, the Pfizer Award for Innovation in Science and Medicine, and the John Logie Baird Award for Innovation. In one current project, the Alzheimer test is being used to identify new ways to detect the effects of drug treatment on the brain in patients who just begin to receive treatment. This project is carried out by a multidisciplinary team from Psychology, Biomedical Engineering (Strathclyde University), Diagnostic Potentials Ltd, and the NHS.

March 25th 2009:
Petra Vetter (one of our postdocs) played a central role in a recent BBC 2 Horizon programme with David Baddiel as the presenter. Filmed at UCL, the focus was on Brian Butterworth's work on dyscalculia, a selective deficit in numerical and mathematical abilities. Petra stimulated with TMS (Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation) the area in the brain that is supposedly crucial for numerical processing (right intraparietal sulcus) while David was doing a number comparison task. View a video clip here

March 23rd 2009:
On 13-3-2009, The Social Interactions Project held a highly successful event entitled 'The Science of Social Interaction' in collaboration with Glasgow's Science Centre. It was attended by over 200 pupils from schools throughout Scotland. The event showcased the psychology of first impressions and their consequences, and comprised of a number of hands-on demonstrations and topical exhibits, which provided the visiting pupils with exposure to real science they might not otherwise experience. View the site here

March 19th 2009:
David Simmons appears in the BBC4 documentary "Britain's Best Drives" (BBC 4, 8.30pm, Thursday 26th March). David talks to the presenter, actor and former Glasgow University rector Richard Wilson, about the psychology behind why people like looking at mountain scenery. Shown is a picture of David with Richard taken at the end of filming by the banks of Loch Katrine last July.

March 6th 2009:
Lorna Morrow (with Jane Mackenzie (Learning and Teaching Centre) and Rob McKerlie (GU Dental School)) has developed a new on-line resource, called 'beSoTLed', to support staff who wish to explore their teaching practice and its impact on the learning of their students in a scholarly way through engaging in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) - view the site here

February 20th 2009:
Darwin Illusion - To commemorate Darwin Day, Rob Jenkins (University of Glasgow) and Richard Wiseman (University of Hertfordshire) teamed up to create an unusual optical illusion. The Darwin Illusion website attracted 50,000 visitors in the first 24 hours. "People are fascinated by illusions. This internet release shows just how quickly an idea can spread", said Dr. Jenkins. "The tipping point was when Stephen Fry plugged the illusion on his Twitter", added Prof. Wiseman. The Darwin Illusion can be seen here.

February 20th 2009:
Rob Jenkins (University of Glasgow) and Richard Wiseman (University of Hertfordshire) teamed up for the cover feature of the February 14th issue of New Scientist magazine. Thousands of people took part in a unique online experiment that links appearances with personality. "People are inclined to associate certain looks with certain character traits", said Dr. Jenkins. "The question is whether or not they are accurate". "The implications are huge", added Prof. Wiseman. "From court appearances to interviews, first impressions are important for us to understand." Read more about the research at the New Scientist Website

December 16th 2008:
"First impressions: The science of social interaction" by Rob Jenkins (on the right) and Simon Garrod appears in the ESRC's flagship publication, "Britain In 2009". The article ties in with the department's ESRC/MRC-funded large grant "Social interaction: A cognitive neuroscience approach". You can access "Britain In 2009" at WH Smiths, Borders, Waitrose, Sainsbury, and Tesco.

December 16th 2008:
David Kelly and Roberto Caldara (on the right) have recently been awarded an ESRC grant of £81,767 to investigate 'The impact of culture on perception and face processing during development'.

November 24th 2008:
Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging (CCNi) / Social Interactions Project Launch Event: On Friday 28th November 2008 we are launching the new ‘Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging’ (CCNi) and officially launching our project ‘Social Interaction: a cognitive neurosciences approach’ which is jointly-funded by ESRC and MRC, and associated with CCNi.

November 17th 2008:
Linda Moxey and Tony Sanford have just obtained an ESRC grant of £79,918 for one year to examine "Using scenario-mapping theory to predict plural reference".

November 13th 2008:
Amanda Neil and David Robertson are the joint winners of the Alastair Weir Prize for the best academic performance in third year honours. They received their cash prizes from Mike Burton, our HoD, at a recent ceremony in the Department.

November 13th 2008:
Congratulations to Emanuele de Luca (a new M.Sc. student in our Department) who has been awarded €2000 by the Italian academic foundation Fondazione G. Ronchi for his paper “Studio dei tempi di reazione su compiti di scelta che richiedono l’identificazioner dei volta...”

November 13th 2008:
Vincenzo Romei, Micah Murray and Gregor Thut have been awarded the poster prize at the Third International Conference on TMS and DCS in Göttingen. Their poster’s title is: “Looming sounds selectively and pre-consciously enhance visual cortex excitability.”

November 13th 2008:
Ian Bushnell has joined the organising committee of the British Psychological Society’s Division of Occupational Psychology and chairs the Training & Development subcommittee responsible for a programme of CPD events throughout the year.

November 13th 2008:
Postgraduate students at Glasgow enthusiastically settling into their first Matlab tutorial of the session.

November 13th 2008:
Mike Burton’s end of award report for his ESRC grant “Individual variation in face perception” has just earned him an ‘outstanding’ rating by the Evaluation Directorate. (Award jointly held with Allan McNeill). The report can be found here.